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Chronicles of Cohabitation


UPDATE on my life, if anybody cares. My ~boyfriend~ and I recently made a huge life changing decision to ~move in together~ … ok it’s not that life changing since I was already spending most weekends at his place anyway. But it’s a pretty big step to me.

Anywho… I know not everyone agrees with it… (Dad, I’m talking to you)

How could we do this?

Live together.

Unmarried.

Shacking up.

Living in sin, I know. But hear me out on this one… I can list a million different reasons we chose to live together… I’m not living out of a duffle bag on the weekends, we get to see each other everyday (hello, I kinda like the guy), but the main reason is so that this can be a trial run. A test period, so to speak…

Some old fashion peeps might think an engagement or marriage should come before or along with moving in together… I disagree.

What if we get married, and I find something that irks me… Like, oh, I don’t know, the beard trimmings he leaves in the sink… or the fact that he takes his socks off in the living room and leaves them there? (This is hypothetical, of course)

What if I discover that he is physically incapable of rinsing out the sink or picking up his socks? Or what if he simply refuses to do either of those things as an act of rebellion?

What if I find myself married to a sockless bearded monster who can’t stand the amount of clothes I have? Or the fact that I let clothes sit in the dryer and get all wrinkly again?

This is why I think moving in together is so beneficial. We can test the waters and ask ourselves, “How much do I really love this person? Is it worth picking up his socks? Is he willing to clean his own beard trimmings?”

This is all hypothetical, again.

Breaking up or moving out is one thing. Divorce is quite another. Not that I see either of these things happening in our future. So far, the beard trimmings and socks don’t bother me badly enough. But keep an eye out for more Chronicles of Cohabitation.

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How to be a Grownup (for twenty somethings)


I’m 21 and I still live at my parents house, so technicallyFullSizeRender I’m just a really old teenager. Nonetheless, twenty-somethings are all different. This is a really weird time when everyone you grew up with is doing different things. Some twenty-somethings are in college, others are graduated. Some just enlisted in the military, and lots are getting married. A few twenty-somethings have kids, and some are studying abroad. This is a time where you kinda have to get your shit together. Not entirely though. (That’s what thirties are for)

Here’s how I’m sort of halfway attempting to become an adult.

  • Keeping up with bills. This is a lot harder than it sounds. I’m not sure how many bills the average person has but I feel like mine are endless. They’re spread all throughout the month. It’s as if God did this so I never feel too comfortable with my finances. 🙂 I’m finally paying off the credit cards I “accidentally” maxed out in college. But every time I get close, I get a speeding ticket or a flat tire. Or I just really needed a vodka soda after work… Whatever, I’m getting there.
  • Healthcare and a 401k. I’m not entirely sure how a 401k even works. But my job has one. I went ahead and filled out the paperwork for the maximum amount I can contribute because I like to believe that I’ll be rich when I retire. Regardless of whether or not that will be the case. I’ve got health insurance now too. Which is a total joke. What the hell is a deductible, anyway?
  • Trying to pay rent. Parents as landlords are kind of a joke, honestly.  Unless yours are like really hardcore, it’s super easy to get out of paying rent. I’m usually pretty broke and my mom feels bad for me and doesn’t mention it. Occasionally she’s like, “So maybe you should start paying rent next month.” Whereas I’m like “Dang, I would but I just bought new tires :(” #Adulting
    Disclaimer: Parents, don't let your twenty-something move back in. They'll never pay rent and you'll feel guilty asking for it.

Anyway if you have any idea how a 401k works and you pay rent to a landlord or even your parents, you’re already a step ahead of me. So, I’m not engaged or responsible enough to take care of a baby? I’m just proud I can balance a checkbook.

LOL JK what’s a checkbook?